Why Work With A Personal Trainer?

Personal training is a relatively new profession. A few decades ago, the only people that had trainers were athletes or models earning millions of dollars a year. But now, the fitness industry is one of the fastest growing sectors of the economy.

What changed?

Simply put, the public realized that more activity than our daily lives provided was necessary to live a healthy life. In addition, structuring physical activity long-term requires guidance by professionals trained in the human sciences.

Doctors are now recommending patients hire a trainer to help them get fit and stay active. We have started realizing that the standard advice promoting pharmaceuticals and refined foods is not helping the public. Doctors are now recommending patients with severe conditions to seek out the guidance of trainers and nutritionists. It’s becoming understood that personal trainers and nutritionists have more time and energy to dedicate to staying on top of new research and changing science.

But, without a doctors order, why would an individual seek out a personal trainer?

Goal Setting:

In a world filled with photo shopped models and over-sexualized media, it’s hard to figure out exactly what is healthy. Your trainer can help you specify realistic and healthy goals.

Getting Started:

There are millions of articles and suggestions detailing what to do for physical activity, and there are even more movements and specific exercises to utilize. A trainer can take your specific goals, limitations, history, preferences, and time constraints to tailor a program for you.

Education:

Most personal trainers have spent years studying the human body, movement patterns, and kinesiology. Some have educated themselves even further in the field of biomechanics or bio-molecular chemistry.
Keep in mind that not all education is equal though. Look for a trainer that has a college degree in the human sciences or a certification accredited by the NCCA (ACSM, NSCA, NASM, ACE, etc).

Empowerment:

Continuing from the last point, a properly educated trainer will be able to impart their knowledge to you, allowing you to structure your own routines and stay consistent over the long-term.

Rehabilitation & Avoiding Injury:

One final point regarding the education trainers go through – they will be able to help you recover from, or work around, any injuries, restrictions, or limitations you may have.
If you do not have any injuries or other issues, your trainer will ensure that your exercises are safe and effective, thereby avoiding any risk of injury from improper technique or overtraining.

Motivation & Support:

Your trainer will work with you to find what motivates you most! They will help keep you on track, providing a push when needed, or recommending a rest when necessary.
As previously mentioned, many personal trainers are up-to-date on the newest science involving nutrition and other factors, meaning they will be able to support you in every way to help ensure a healthy lifestyle.

Avoiding Boredom:

For many people, going through the same motions and exercises day-to-day will lead to loss of interest, and eventually lack of adherence. A good personal trainer will be able to keep your routines fresh enough to keep you focused, but still consistent enough to track progress.

Making Progress:

Finally, a personal trainer will be able to help you make constant progress over the course of your entire life.

The body will acclimate to any single stimulus in about 4-16 weeks, causing the individual to plateau. Many people will keep pushing, leading to injury, or simply assume they have reached their “limit”. However, if you have well-educated trainer, they will find a simple and effective way to make it possible for you to see continual progress.

There are countless studies proving the benefit of professional guidance, but a very telling and recent study showed that over the course of 10 weeks, individuals working with a trainer increased their strength by 10%, while those without a trainer experienced no improvement. The “novice affect” shows that most strength will be gained in the first 8 weeks of training, but this study was done on already fit and active individuals…yet they still made significant progress.

There are many other reasons to hire a personal trainer but these are the ones that come to mind from my time as a personal trainer.

Almost everyone has a doctor and a dentist, some people have an accountant or a lawyer, and others even have a masseuse or personal assistant. A personal trainer is just one more member of this team that works to serve and benefit you. The only difference with a personal trainer is that they can help keep you healthy for every minute of every day, for your entire life.

So, give it a try today! Look through the trainers available your local gym, investigate their credentials, and pick one you think you’d work best with. After that, the results will speak for themselves!

Recovery Weeks

Wow! It’s been awhile since I’ve posted. Sorry, I was on vacation visiting family throughout New England, and then snowboarding in Stowe, Vermont!

Had a few indulgences, definitely didn’t get as much sleep as normal, and didn’t get into the gym as much as I liked…but heck, it’s only 2 weeks out of the year. And believe me, after those 2 weeks, I couldn’t be happier to get back to pursuing this healthy lifestyle I love so much!

This week, I figured I’d talk about a fitness topic that is overlooked far too often – the importance of a regular, planned recovery week.

No matter what your focus is (fat loss, muscle or strength gain, improved endurance, etc) you can’t train at the same intensity week after week without serious damage to your body and even your mind!

There are many different ways to structure a recovery week. Some people take an entire week off while others just drop the volume of their workouts.

Since my main focus is increasing my strength using heavy powerlifts (squat, bench press, deadlift)  I take what I would call a “deload week” every 5th week. During this week, I drop all my weights or repetitions down so I am only doing about 50% of my normal workload.

I find that, still coming to the gym and going through the motions, but not struggling or pushing too hard, keeps me primed for the following week when I return to my normal intensity level, but offers me a much needed break from the constant stress of trying to handle new, heavier weights.

Even if you aren’t training by lifting heavy, your joints, connective tissues, bones, and muscles are being used in a way that is not typical in everyday life. It’s this imposed demand, and recovery from the demand, that causes the body to improve, getting stronger, faster, or fitter.

The part that most people overlook is the mental aspect of training. One thing I tell all my new clients is that the first 8-12 weeks of a new strength-training routine is where they’ll make the most progress. This isn’t due to increased muscle size but rather a neurological adaptation that improves how the body recruits and fires muscle fibers.

It’s this same neuromuscular connection that fatigues the central nervous system during exercise. There are even anecdotal reports of athletes becoming physically ill the night before squatting, or overtraining with another form of exercise.

For this reason, I recommend everyone take a recovery week every 4 to 12 weeks. The exact frequency, and what to do during this off week, is totally up to the individual, their program, and their goals.

If you are training for general fitness, making slow and steady progress but never pushing too hard to set personal records, working out at a moderate intensity 2 to 5 days a week, a recovery week every 8 weeks or so is perfectly sufficient. If you are lifting very heavy, training the muscles to failure, or constantly trying to beat your previous records, a recovery week every 4 weeks or so may be more useful.

The best thing I’ve done for my training, long-term, was to include a recovery week every 8 weeks. Then, once I started powerlifting a few years ago, I increased the frequency of that recovery week to every 5th week.  As an individual with serious lifting goals, it can be tough to force myself to not lift heavy week in and week out…but I know, as soon as I return the next week, the recovery was worth it.

So give it a try! Maybe time your recovery week with a trip you may be taking, or take a short recovery next time you come down with a cold, or just plan a regular week as a light week. I promise the benefits for your body and mind will be worthwhile.